Pilgrim Nuclear: It’s Not Over – But We’re On The Road To Recovery!

Entergy’s announcement that it will close Pilgrim by June 2019 brought relief to many. Importantly, closing Pilgrim will bring an end to more than 43 years of destroying marine life and pollution caused by Pilgrim’s once-through cooling system. This is not the end of our involvement in this issue, however.  Along with our allies, we will maintain a strong presence in the effort to ensure the best possible decommissioning and site cleanup.

Our efforts will be focused on four fronts:

1. Decommissioning and Site Cleanup

  • Advocate for complete and prompt site surveys and cleanup so that pollution and contaminants are addressed.
  • Oppose a 60-year “SAFSTOR,” which could leave the contaminated facility and site mothballed for decades.

 2. Nuclear Waste Storage

  • Continue pressure on Entergy to move all spent nuclear fuel out of Pilgrim’s wet pool and into dry cask storage as soon as possible.
  • Continue to support a citizen lawsuit seeking to force Entergy’s compliance with Plymouth’s zoning by-laws and to obtain a special permit for Pilgrim’s nuclear waste storage facility, so that it is robust, stable, and properly sited. Land Court trial likely to occur in spring 2016.
  • Continue to push for better assessments for flooding and climate-related impacts that pose significant risk to the stability of the nuclear waste storage facility being constructed within 175 feet from the shore of Cape Cod Bay.

3. Public Rights to Shoreline

  • Seek to restore public rights to the shoreline along Cape Cod Bay.
  • Pursue ongoing Chapter 91 Waterways License legal appeal to ensure Entergy’s activities truly protect the public and environment. Expect legal decision by the end of 2015, and an appeal if necessary.

4. Transparency and Misinformation

  • Continue shining light on Entergy and regulators to ensure transparency and opportunity for public input.
  • Continue to counter misleading claims by Entergy and others that we are losing “clean” and “carbon-free” energy when Pilgrim closes.

We will continue to learn and keep you abreast of developments as this nuclear chapter is brought to a close. Thanks to everyone for your support and encouragement. We have much to do for the next decade or more, we will all need to work together.

If you would like to get involved or find out more, contact Karen Vale, Cape Cod Bay Watch Campaign Manager, at karen@capecodbaywatch.org, Meg Sheehan, volunteer at megsheehan07@gmail.com, or Pine duBois at pine@jonesriver.org.

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2 Comments

  1. Pilgrim provided tera-watt hours of clean, safe, energy to the people of New England. Antinuclear activists have long lead the charge to backwards movement. They missed the mark at the expense of the environment and human health. Nothing in life is zero risk and the risks of nuclear are much lower relative to other areas in life that antinukes accept.

  2. Cape Cod Bay Watch

    Thanks for your opinion but we disagree that Pilgrim is clean and safe. While CCBW focuses specifically on environmental impacts of Pilgrim (opposed to safety issues), it’s clear that Pilgrim is not safe. It was recently ranked as one of the bottom 2 nuclear facilities in the U.S. in terms of safety (ranked by the federal government, not us). Further, Pilgrim is anything but clean. For our take, please read our recent letter to the Boston Globe about this very issue: http://goo.gl/4JdXU2

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